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New ebook out: The Workflow Book – Organize and Protect your Digital Photographs

The Workflow Book

Just a few months after Montagnes Extrêmes, I am proud to announce the release today of a new book, published by Craft And Vision and titled “The Workflow Book – Organize and Protect your Digital Photographs“. The two couldn’t be more different: Montagnes Extrêmes is a beautiful coffee table physical book, in French, and is all about enjoying nice mountain photography. The Workflow Book, on the other hand, is a large PDF ebook (over 70 spreads), written in English, and is by design very technical. There are of course many mountain images but they are mere illustrations, and what you will really find interesting (I hope) is the text.

What I have attempted with this book is to talk about all the boring parts of digital photography, all the chores one has to deal with, from designing a file naming scheme to choosing the right computer equipment, importing files with Lightroom or Photo Mechanic, editing a shoot down, entering metadata, exporting finished files and, most importantly, how to design a good backup strategy. I don’t discuss how to take pictures, which camera to choose or what to do in Photoshop or Lightroom, as those are vast topics on which many great books have already been written, but instead deal with the lot less sexy tasks that we all have to contend with, whether we like it or not.

Reading this book will absolutely not make you a better photographer, but it might make a you a more efficient one. You will hopefully find ways to streamline your workflow, save some time and energy, and will be able to focus more on what truly matters: creating meaningful photographs!

The Workflow Book

The Workflow Book

The Workflow Book retails for the bargain price of $7 (with 20% off for the first week with the code WFLOW20) and you can find it on the Craft and Vision website. There is also a great “bundle” offer at the moment, which pairs the book with other C&V titles on Lightroom and Photoshop at discounted prices.

You can also find more information on the dedicated page.

The Workflow Book

The Workflow Book

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Blog

Injury

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Two weeks ago, I was busy shooting some freeride images with awesome Norwegian skier Bård Øymar, out in Courmayeur. The day was perfect: blue skies, tons of fresh snow, mostly untracked, and Bård knew exactly where to go to get the best snow and the best light. I got so many good images and great powder turns that I remember thinking I would have to pay for it later…

On our last run of the day, Bård’s fluff triggered a small slab in a couloir, which I failed to notice at first. I was caught by it and ended up riding it down for 15-20m until I came to a natural stop (just before I could trigger my ABS backpack). Unfortunately, because it was moving relatively slow and it caught me while I was stopped, my binding did not release, and I suffered a left knee injury. I tried to ski out, but a single turn nearly resulted in a dislocated knee and convinced me that rescue was the only reasonable option. 45 minutes later, I was winched off by the Courmayeur rescue helicopter, and flown to the Aosta hospital.

Since then, I’ve had a MRI to confirm the initial diagnostic, and consulted with orthopaedic surgeon, with the conclusion that my left ACL has been cleanly severed and that surgery will be required. Thankfully, there is very little pain and I can walk almost normally, I just don’t have any lateral stability.

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My ambitious plans for the spring and summer have obviously been greatly affected. The good news, though, is that I’ll still manage to go to Greenland in late April as initially planned, using a special splint as a substitute for my injured ACL. And as soon as I come back from the expedition, around May 15th, I’ll be having surgery. Rehab is forecast to take about 6 months, which means I probably won’t be able to climb at all during the summer season.

This is obviously a very big bummer, as there were so many things I wanted to do this spring and summer, but injury is a common occurrence for people who spend a lot of time in the mountains, and I am trying to take it in stride. It also means I get a chance to focus on other projects I wouldn’t otherwise spend so much time on (or instance promoting my next book on workflow, which is coming out later this month ;-D).

Winter 2014/2015 better be damn good!

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